28 March 2014

ONE PRINT DECORATING–RIGHT OR WRONG?

 

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Last week, we looked at the beautiful living room by Ladye Kay Allen from Dallas.  The slips actually are only for the spring and summer – they are put away in the winter months.   While there are other fabrics besides the Peter Fasano stripe in the room – it is the most dominant fabric.

 

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In addition to the living room, the dining room also has the seasonal slips.   I love this look.  I love one fabric/one print decorating, my own house is filled mostly with white linen slipcovers.  I love the cohesive look to a room or a house when mostly one fabric is used, but is it boring? 

 

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Dan Carithers designed this room 25 years ago using the linen stripe as the only pattern.  I fell so in love with this room that I copied it in my first house, using the same linen stripe on all the furniture except for a few pillows and a skirted table.   Stripes are particularly attractive when used as a singular fabric in a room.

 

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Another living room – showing one main fabric, a blue and white stripe.

 

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Lee Radziwill likes to decorate using one fabric.  Here she used a stripe in her NYC apartment. 

 

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Another room of Lee Radziwill’s in her former Paris apartment shows everything covered in the same toile pattern.  Is decorating with one pattern a good design statement – or is it a lazy way to decorate?  Would this room above look better if there were different patterns here – or does this one toile make a fabulous statement?  I vote for the fabulous statement.

 

 

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Checks are another popular fabric to use in one-fabric/pattern decorating.

 

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This bright blue and white check looks more effective used everywhere in the room.  It would have been even more effective if the fabric was put on the walls.

 

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Using one fabric is not a new idea.  The earliest rooms most often had one fabric, as shown here in Versailles.

 

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The French aristocracy used one fabric to cover the walls, furniture, curtains and beds. Of course there wasn’t a decorative center back there with a million choices of fabrics. 

 

 

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Toiles are a popular fabric for one fabric decorating. 

 

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Charlotte Moss used this red toile, mixing it with a silk leopard velvet.

 

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Another popular fabric is a Tree of Life pattern.  Here, one fabric covers almost everything.  Again, it is hard to imagine this room decorated with many fabrics instead.

 

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Ginny Magher used one floral print in her former bedroom in Atlanta.  The effect is beautiful and pleasing.

 

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This room has a pretty yellow/green toile covering everything, including the walls.

 

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Blue and white toile is a popular choice – the white bed linens help to break up expanse of toile and the break in the pattern is a good choice.

 

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There are several toiles that have become popular for one fabric decorating – this Old World Weavers toile is quite popular.

 

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Here the same toile in the red colorway.  The mustard colorway is also very popular.

 

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This Scalamandre toile is another very popular toile  - especially in the green colorway. 

 

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Here it is mixed with a brown check.  The fabric has long vines running through it that are especially feminine and pretty and simulate movement.

 

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Another room with the Scalamandre toile.

 

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One of the most iconic fabrics for this type of decorating is this Brunschwig &  Fils pattern –  Verrieres.  This room in the Verrieres estate is where the fabric got its name.   Louise Vilmorin is pictured in her drawing room – as it was decorated for many decades, never changed.  I’m very familiar with this fabric as my parents had a bedroom decorated in it– but their rug was a needlepoint in cream, with the flowers in the blue.  It popped the fabric much better than this rug, I must say! 

 

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Another view of the room – notice the tea table with the blue and white porcelains imbedded in it.  Little Augury has a wonderful story about the history of this room and it’s fabric HERE.

 

 

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Mario Buatta used the iconic fabric in this most celebrated Kips Bay Showhouse room.  He mixed in a few other fabrics including persimmon silk on the vanity table.

 

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The tall curtains were so pretty. 

 

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In the corner, Buatta covered a sofa in the toile.

 

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Years later Buatta used the same fabric in another room.  The scalloped edge is used on the hem.

 

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A vintage room with Verrieres.  Too much of a good thing?  Perhaps a bed covered in white linens would have provided a break from all the blue?

 

 

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Here it is in Peach – in another vintage room. 

 

 

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This fabric is often used in one pattern decorating – it is a newer design by Manuel Canovas.  Here, Ginny Magher used it in the black colorway in her Provence house – mixing in blue bedding which is a nice touch.

 

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Mario Buatta effectively used the Canovas Melon toile here.

 

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A close up of the Buatta room.

 

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The pink color way is very pretty.  Amanda Nisbet.

 

 

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Buatta again. 

 

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A vintage English room – with a creamy bedspread.

 

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Gerrie Bremermann used the fabric in peach.

 

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Another popular fabric used in one pattern decorating is Bennison Roses, shown here in Carol Glasser’s former bedroom.  After Carol showed this bedroom in a magazine, many copycats sprung up using Roses.  It is still a favorite of mine.  Shannon Bowers used it in her bedroom in gray – in the new Milieu issue.

 

One of the most iconic fabrics used in single pattern decorating is Bowood – the Colefax and Fowler fabric.  Bowood is named after a piece of fabric that the famous decorator John Fowler found on the estate Bowood, which he then had manufactured.  Over the years – it has become one of the most popular fabrics used.  The three roses fabric comes in two colorways – in glazed cotton or union.   This month’s House Beautiful featured a delightful beach house designed entirely in Bowood.

 

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The Hamptons house is designed by Justine Cushing, a New York blue blood interior designer.  Her sister bought the former garage which is right next to the old Cushing summer house – a barn and cottage, also decorated by Justine.  

 

 

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The former garage was a wreck when they bought it sight unseen.  They opened up two rooms to make the large living/dining room.  To unite the small house, all walls were clad in beadboard and the wood floors are all painted white.  Bowood was used everywhere – to great appeal, I think.  You might think it’s a lazy way to decorate!  Here, white sofas, floor and walls pop against the Bowood.

 

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Looking toward the front window – Cushing believes in reusing all furniture already owned.  Nothing goes to waste.  I like the green coverlets she used on the white sofas.

 

 

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Looking across from the living room to the dining area.  Cushing says, as do other decorators who favor using one fabric – that it unites furniture which is mismatched.  If you cover a room full of old furniture in one fabric – it tends to make it look decorated and special. 

 

 

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The dining room.  The two gold consoles are pricey family antiques.

 

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Before she decided to use Bowood everywhere – she had ordered this fabric for the kitchen blind.  It’s the one fabric that is different!

 

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The upstairs landing – with antique chairs and chest.

 

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The master bedroom with the sofa covered in, Bowood, of course!

 

 

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The master bedroom – I love the purple and white quilt used with the Bowood.

 

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The guest room with handmade afghans.

 

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The bathroom with the Bowood covered vanity.

Too much Bowood?   I love the way the small cottage looks, all covered in the rose fabric.   You would certainly have to love the fabric, but the simple, pretty Bowood is easy to love.  It is so airy and simple and sweet.   I love this beach house and would copy it, given a chance.  Can’t imagine another fabric that could replace the Bowood though.  Can you?

 

Here is a look at how other designers have used Bowood:

 

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Here, it is mixed with checks.

 

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Checks and solid fabrics and mirrors keep the Bowood from dominating.

 

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Architect Gil Shafer used Bowood on the walls and ceiling to unify the attic room.

 

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Bowood used sparingly in this French bedroom.

 

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And again – the Bowood dresses down this fancy room.

 

 

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Bowood in the red colorway – it is not nearly as popular as the green.

 

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A dining room – with Bowood curtain.  Love this!

 

 

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Justine Cushing.  Does that name sound familiar to you?  A few bloggers have posted pictures of a Hamptons cottage owned by the Cushing family.  The rooms had been decorated for decades and almost 10 years ago House Beautiful showed the house as it had been carefully and sparingly updated by Justine.   I found the location of the house – the original barn and cottage combined – across the street from the Atlantic Ocean.  You can see the house where the blue dot is above.  And – right next to it – is the former garage turned cottage that Justine’s sister just bought – and which she decorated entirely in the Bowood fabric.  The two houses both shown in House Beautiful – a decade apart – are wonderful Hampton houses.  Instead of the huge mega mansions found there now, these are original, small cottages clad in shingles that remind you of what the Hamptons used to be like.

 

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The original Cushing cottage – the barn living room.  The walls are covered in a pansy paper.  Most of the pieces are slipcovered in a Lee Jofa linen.  The zebra rug here and in the garage/cottage is really a hooked rug.  The slips covering the dining room chairs are in the faded companion print to the chintz. 

 

 

 

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The gorgeous crystal chandelier is a surprise in the barn cottage. 

 

 

 

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Close up of the dining room slips.

 

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Here you can just barely see the decades old faded pansy wallpaper.  The family calls this painting the Pom Pom Hat.

 

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The piano is flanked by the chintz fabric.

 

 

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In the cottage living room – one fabric is used to cover all the furniture and the curtains.  You can see that Cushing loves one fabric/pattern decorating.

 

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  Another view of the living room.

 

 

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Cushing recovered these old family pieces in a check to go with the discontinued floral fabric.

 

 

 

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In Justine Cushing’s New York City apartment – she also used one fabric decorating.  A floral chintz covers all the upholstered pieces – with a stripe used on the pillows. 

 

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Finally – Tory Burch’s living room has a multitude of fabrics, including the famous Bowood which covers the sofa.  This room is surely a positive vote for the use of many fabrics, not just one.  This interesting and beautiful room would not look half as good if it was all Bowood.  How do you know when to decorate using only one fabric instead of many?  

One decision might be when you have a host of mismatched chairs and sofas and using one fabric tends to hide the busyness of that situation.   Or is the room plain with no architectural interest?   Or, are all the ceilings sloping and uneven?  Walls covered in one fabric can hide that.  

But, perhaps the main reason may just be the fabric itself.  Is the one fabric/pattern chosen pretty enough to star in the room?  Is it pleasing enough, serene enough?  The fabric can’t be one that would irritate or be jarring if it is the only one to be used.  Is it a classic, as opposed to a trendy new fabric?  Don’t chose a fabric that will obviously scream a certain year.   When choosing a fabric – look to vintage rooms for inspiration.   

In the end, the decision to decorate in one fabric might just be a leap of faith!!

 

AND – if you live in Houston, check out this moving sale!!!!

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65 comments:

  1. I love each and every one of these rooms! I have always admired the look of rooms wholly adorned in toile as well.
    This post reminded me of Kim Kardashian's sofa dress...LOL!
    http://rollingout.com/fashion/vogue-hates-kim-kardashians-floral-sofa-dress-too-diss-from-the-mag-published/3/#_

    xo

    Andie

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  2. One print pony is a no go - awful.

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    1. I totally agree ... all this print would drive me batty!!! I too think it is awful and, to me, requires no real decorating skill ... just find a print & use it all over ... ugh! I long for the days of Joni's postings of beautiful Houston or like homes, light, simple and elegant. Bring those back, Joni.

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    2. funny. everyone complained about too much houston!!! seriously?

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  3. Every time I see a room with one fabric I always think that they must also be the person who loves routine and change is the worst. I like it but I think I would go bonkers if I was a one print fabric person. Too boring! But to each his own, done well it's striking!

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  4. Well if you asked me this 6 years ago my answer would have been different. I happen to really like a lot of the images shown. I think it looks great. It's not a lazy way to decorate, it's a certain look. It also evokes an emotional response for me, that now speaks comfort. It would depend on the location of the home and style, but I'm in!
    Sharon

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  5. Love the Bowood soo much that I used it in my kitchen for curtains; found old stock on eBay, but in the green/red color way...makes me happy every time I walk into the kitchen ..
    Wonderful post again. Joni, thank you!
    Dolores

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  6. Your knowledge is so appreciated! It always gives plenty to think about.

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  7. Disaster last night, solution here this morning.

    Cat lept from 1st floor to 2nd floor balcony last night, smash/crash. Must move launching pad. The Buatta room with back-to-back sofas? Will soon be my living room arrangement. Go cat !

    Lazy or bold?

    Seems a thrifty way to decorate if done right. Do it once with only minor tweaks thru the decades.

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

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  8. what a fabulous post- I was "pinning" away-
    So many of these looks really stand up over the years- there's something so serene and timeless about using one great pattern so well.

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  9. I love one fabric rooms, but most houses can accommodate only one such strong statement. The first time I ever saw an all one room was in a display at Bering's in the early eighties. I loved it so much I bought the display camelback sofa when it went on sale and set up a little one fabric room. Right now I have a one fabric guest room known to all my nieces and nephews as the "monkeys" room because the Scalamandre chintz and wallpaper in the room, Chinoise Exotique, includes monkeys. I love the rooms you have included in your post in toiles and the ones in checks. Great post, thank you!

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  10. So very pretty....that's why for forty years our bedroom (slanted ceiling and all) has been the same wall covering, bedding, etc...very, very pale blue/lavender pansies. Personally, I think it depends on the architecture, to me, it would be so "out of place" in anything modern, etc. Luv'd your photos!! franki

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  11. Joni, that iconic Mario Buatta showhouse bedroom is fabulous beyond words. You have some great rooms featured here, and the bedroom with the sitting area all covered in the Tree of Life fabric stopped me in my tracks. Wow! I think this can be used very successfully to unify varied elements in furnishings. And I have always loved stripes and have had them in every house.

    Mentioning Mario Buatta, I just took his advice and painted a ceiling blue. In another article, he said to paint a kitchen ceiling yellow when you have white cabinets. That is next! I adore the blue, and so do my painters and husband. I attempted to faux finish a lantern I don't like till I can buy the one I do, and it actually turned out surprisingly well. Let's pray it doesn't all flake off before the end of the party that inspired it. ;-) Now I am off to see about the yard. Mr. Magpie fired the yard man. The party is on Tuesday. Thirty women coming to hear a lecture by a friend. Argh!

    xo

    Sheila

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  12. Perfect posting for a sunny spring morning! Bowood is indeed the true fabric of spring and summer -- so very fresh and charming!
    Beautiful rooms -- and I love the use of one printed fabric, plus neutrals and then add a dash or two of vivid color -- even fresh flowers in a gorgeous vase!

    Thanks for all of your hard work -- again -- this posting would make a wonderful design book!(still waiting ..... tapping foot ..... waiting!)

    Cheers! Jan at Rosemary Cottage

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  13. Where I buy my fabric, 18 yards is the minimum to special order a fabric. When you buy a full bolt (35 yards), the rest of the yardage is practically free because the fabric / design store does not want to sit on the rest of the bolt waiting for it to sell.

    I think a large room done in one print is much cozier than a large room done in many prints. However, Charles Faudree would have proven me wrong!

    Smiles from My Slice of Provence,
    Charlotte Des Fleurs.

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  14. It's not for me to say what's right or wrong for others but personally, my senses needs a little variety. Just a tad so as not to loose the serene feeling. The ones with the simpler fabric are nice but those bolder ones would drive me bonkers.

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  15. Joni I have to admit that only a few of these rooms appeal to me. As Diana V said The Eye Must Travel; however I believe the eye must also rest.
    I suppose for me that means too much of the same fabric can be overload,cluttered looking and a bit passe. There is a fine line indeed.
    xoxo
    Karena
    The Arts by Karena

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  16. I think this was my favorite post ever! You picked so many of the fabrics that I love and, almost without exception, these rooms sing. One fabric decorating is classic...but it does take a lot of restraint if you are a fabric freak. Thank you for a great Saturday morning read.

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  17. Nice thought provoking post! I do like several of the rooms, mostly the ones with stripes, but many look dated to me, patterns too busy, nowhere for my eye to take a break. I think I would get very tired of the busier patterns very quickly, especially if repeated throughout the home.

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  18. The Dan Carithers room that is 25 years old looks amazing even today! Some of these rooms I really adore but my husband would never ever go for the fabrics (except maybe the subtle stripes). I will admit that most of these fabrics seem feminine to me and if they're billowing around a bed, even more so. Beautiful, of course, but not something I could sell to my husband.

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  19. I don't mind one print everywhere..its very traditional and cohesive. But, the accessories have to be outstanding for it to work -accessories really become the focus in a room like this - which was my problem with pink slip- covered room you last featured - the furniture with the pink slips is beautiful - love that fabric...but the accessories just failed to me.

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  20. I liked Justine Cushing's Hamptons house, but the others made me claustrophobic! Too much of one pattern, especially on the ceiling too, made me feel boxed in. But, to each his own...

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  21. I was looking over the pictures again and I think texture is important too here. I haven't really looked or thought about these types of rooms in awhile. I do remember always loving Lee Radazwill (sp) rich striped room and I recognized a couple others, too. Somehow many of these rooms stay current - probably because they are so well done to begin with. Thanks for the post!

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  22. Joni, Thank you for bringing these images together. It convinced me that playing with one print is actually more neutral than composing a room with several different patterns. I adore all of Mario's work. Studying his images together is like taking a master class in Interior Design. Well done!

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  24. For me it's WRONG. I think it's boring and safe, not a bit interesting. Vicky Darnell

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  25. There are some very pretty rooms pictured here. Personally, I could never live with the same fabric on all the upholstery, walls, ceiling, and drapes. The rooms I like best are bedrooms with plain walls and the print used on the drapes and upholstery and mixed with solids on the bed. Though the Hamptons cottage pictured in House Beautiful is charming, I think using the Bowood fabric everywhere is way too repetitious. I still prefer the Bennison roses look and don't care for the melon toile at all. I can't imagine what the repeat is on that, and there must be a huge amount of waste left on the cutting room floor. In general, I'm not a fan of all-over chintz, or stripes either, in a living area, though I think it looks very English (and I love all things English). I think it takes the right kind of traditional room and architecture and furniture. I find mixing fabrics more appealing, as long as it doesn't go overboard or when there's nothing to tie them together. Do I sound conflicted? I think I am.

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  26. beauty truly is in the eye of the beholder- I agree with a lot of the comments that one print is repetitious and -to me- jarring and not serene or soothing. But obviously a certain eye sees beauty and symmetry in the sameness of it all. If sound can be a cacophony then this is the same experience to me except as a visual impression. To each his own.

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  27. Before commenting, I have taken several long looks at the photos in this post. I understand why Joni has always loved the Dan Carithers room. The fabrics are quiet and are bolstered by the architectural elements of the room. Having realized this, I began to notice the elements in the remaining pictures and those which were the most striking, needed architectural elements to support the redundancy of the fabric. I especially love Mario's Canovas' Melon fabric because of it's lack of saturation. It works because it remains light and airy. As to Bowood, please if I never see it again it will not be too soon. It is totally boring. I cannot understand the affection for this fabric.

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  28. No matter how beautiful a pattern is, I think the eye needs a rest. Matchy-matchy looks contrived. BUT what I appreciate is YOU putting together this well-researched post, even if I had to look away from the monitor every now and then.

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  29. Joni! This is your best post ever!

    Your images are divine! The most iconic room EVER I have seen is Louise Vilmorin! At Verrierres! My first fabric in my first house!

    What a brilliant post! What i found confounding was your analysis! What on earth are you thinking? You are second-guessing ?? I don't get it!!

    Do you really think you know better than Lee Radziwill???

    That is my only problem!@

    By the way...I LOVE "the skirted roundtable"

    Where are the new episodes?????

    Yikes!!!

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    1. Ignore Penelope. Thousands of people "know better than Lee Radziwell." Radziwell is no decorator. She's nothing but a career golddigger.

      (Penelope, stop being so googly-eyed about celebrities. It's undignified.)

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  30. Nice selection of iconic fabrics, Joni - you sure are a decorating maven because you chose some of the most famous like Bowood and Verrieres. Catherine Deneuve was once featured in World of Interiors talking about her garden and she mentioned she used the Verrieres fabric in her country house in Normandy. Also in Normandy on the English channel near Dieppe is the noted house and garden, Bois de Moustiers. I had the luck of seeing inside this historic home not normally open to the public: one room was furnished in Verrieres.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/lost-in-france-the-lutyens-jewel-that-nobody-wants-2364008.html

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  32. Glancing through others' comments, it appears my observation is not 'original'...one print decorating acts as a neutral--plays a supporting role--for specific furniture and/or art to shine. I noticed that the most successful rooms had elements that allowed the eye to rest. I noted "Cushing believes in reusing all furniture already owned. Nothing goes to waste." Absolutely, when you own furniture and art as fabulous as hers'. Thanks Joni for another, as always, wonderful post.

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  33. While this look is harder to pull off in the States, in France it's still classic and well-loved. For small bedrooms especially, it works really well, which is why I'm still considering it for our two small bedrooms. I wouldn't get tired of a toile or tree of life bedroom! Thanks for the beautiful post~

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    1. With the exception of a toile, and a handful of florals, I think decorating with the same pattern can look very dated. This month's House Beautiful cover (you've included in your post) left me flat and uninspired. Much prefer a thoughtful mix of pattern, texture and color. Love your blog and your insightful commentaries.

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  34. Great post, and those were the right questions to ask oneself as well. It depends so much on the age and style of the house, the ceiling height (Walls, ceilings and upholstery in a room with 8 foot ceilings could be warm and cozy, or very claustrophobic) room size, moldings, how tailored or frilly are the trimmings, etc. Chintz can be so pretty and fresh all over, or, it could look like grandma's house. Beautiful pictures! xo, N.G.

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  35. After perusing all of the pictures, I think that the most pleasing single-pattern rooms are those with:
    1) Color on a white background (especially if the walls are covered) -- otherwise the room starts to feel too heavy; and
    2) The pattern is staggered with some free lines flowing throughout. The Bowood, for example, looks great on upholstery pieces, but becomes too monotonous on large expanses like walls. Too "block-y". Toile, by contrast, works on large surfaces because of its flowing lines.

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  36. I love mixing colors and patterns and that is definitely my preferred decor combo. I'm not a big fan of one print decorating, but I think it looks great in some cases. I guess it depends on the whole interior, the style of the room and the entire house. Great pics!
    Carpet cleaners NW3

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    1. I agree, the all over print needs either a tiny room where it makes a huge statement - such as a very small washroom, or in those lofty high ceilinged rooms. I bet old Lee Radzilliwilli or whatever, used to get migraines from all that pattern - and in red too! Also, sad to say, you need the right house. A very modern house won't take those lovely old wallpapers, which in turn cry out for objects that have some age and patina to them. Gilt mirrors and turnwood tables. I am from England and it's very difficult here to find new builds that have any grace or charm at all, yet I notice (mostly from reviewing this blog site!), that new builds in America often hint at other eras, are given charm and could easily accommodate different interior styles, whereas the often square box sets over here, allow for no whimsy whatsoever.

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  37. I can't believe you like that House Beautiful cover! I hated it. Hate the way the corner is boxed in with the chair in front of the sofa. Hate the clashing butterfly stool. The fabric being used allover in one room is fine (can even be great) but NOT all over the entire house! Every bedroom? That hardly seems like decorating. If that were a friend's house and I walked into that room on the cover I would be SHOCKED to hear it was done by a designer. And to have it on the cover - I just don't get it.

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    1. I agree with you on this ... the house is cute but it seems a cop-out way of decorating ... it made me wonder if the decorator got some great close-out deal on a hundred yards of that fabric and passed on to her client. Very odd ... and not something to be congratulated.

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  38. Oh my! This really got my decorating juices flowing ... I LOVE one print decorating and LOVE florals prints. Also some of the stripes are fabulous.
    I'm ready to re-do our guest rooms and am now inspired to go with one fabulous print in each room. Thank you!
    I do have to say that, even though I know you love the first photo with the pink chairs, etc ... I just could NOT live with that pink ... (and would never ask my husband to!) Haha ...
    Thanx, Joni ... your blog is always so great and I know you must spend a great deal of time on it. I appreciate it.
    Gail

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  39. The whole house is just too much, it looks like the fabric truck tipped over and they ended up with 1000 yards of the same thing. Your posts are amazing... I miss the podcasts: (

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  40. "Fabric Trust" - a great description of the HB house. How do you go from room to room and see the same fabric day to day and not be totally sick of it in a month. This designer really pulled a fast one over the owner imo.

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    1. Meant to say "Fabric Truck" - ooops need my glasses

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  41. Dearest Joni - the one room to which I must say an emphatic "Non", is Cushing's Master Bedroom with the Boxwood mixed with purple and white quilts. The background of the boxwood is off white or perhaps ivory while the background of both the quilt and the sheets (in blue) is white. Non, non, non! The white of the sheets and quilt makes the boxwood fabric look dirty.

    As your friend and advertiser, author of "Color Me Happy" suggests, keep the colors in the same undertone. The Boxwood fabric in the green colorway is a "dirty" color. If the sheets and quilt had had an ivory background, the room would have sung!

    Smiles from My Slice of Provence, Charlotte Des Fleurs

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    ReplyDelete
  43. This is a wonderful article and I LOVE one fabric decorating. Don't pay any attention to these dopes who complain all the time instead of doing something creative themselves. Keep on doing what you're doing!!!!!!

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  44. And Miss Annie Darcy of Decor Data fame, it doesn't appear that anyone is complaining except you. Perhaps if you improve on your skills, you will soon learn to put more than one fabric together.

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  45. The Bowood reminds me of Lauren Ross-any plans to feature her again?

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  46. "Right or Wrong"? Who is to say? Like or Dislike, yes. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, Joni, and it comes in many forms!

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  47. Loved the post!!! Just got back from New Orleans... Heaven! Land of beautiful antiques that have been spared the Clorox.. The trip reminded what is trendy and what is timeless. This look is so lovely. It's a classic.

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  48. I thoroughly enjoyed his post and appreciate how much work you put in it.

    I think it is an excellent question. I think this works better in bedrooms or loos but less successful in other living areas. I can see why people love or hate it however. I must say that there is something quite comforting with the repetition. Also the fractal nature of it is something that appeals to our primal sense. I would love to do a room but I find men are less enthusiastic about this!

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  49. Actually I am a fan of the harmonious pattern, but when you start splashing toile around everywhere, to me you just lose the coherency of the room. The effect is more like camouflage and ends up to be a distraction to overall greater design.

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  50. I agree with a lot of the comments that one print is repetitious and -to me- jarring and not serene or soothing. But obviously a certain eye sees beauty and symmetry in the sameness of it all. If sound can be a cacophony then this is the same experience to me except as a visual impression. I would like to say Thanks for sharing such a nice collection and selection as well.

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  51. I am a fan of one fabric decorating, but when it is done precisely and with style.
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  52. Toiles and certain other fabric prints were meant to be stand alone's in a room. They have more presence then and do not get diluted with multiple filler fabrics. You do not need to have a room with each piece of furniture covered in something different, the print needs to "zebra" around the room in order to have impact. The scale of the piece of the furniture also demands what fabric is right for it too, so that large scale Canovas print on a small slipper chair might not work and then you can do a leopard or a stripe. And never ever use pillows out of the same print as your sofa as it just looks like you had extra and did not know what to do with the yardage.

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