29 July 2009

Cote De Texas - Top Ten Design Elements - #3

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Narrowing down the list of design elements that I love to just ten items proved difficult – so in the end, I combined a few to fit everything into a neat list of 10. By contrast, choosing the first three items was very simple - they are so connected I even toyed with the idea of making them just one element: linen, slipcovers and seagrass. Most of the pictures of examples I show will usually have these three items together. The linen slipcover with seagrass rug is a look that I adore and am strongly drawn to – there is no explanation. Either you understand the attraction or you don’t. I can and do appreciate all styles of design from contemporary to the hip Hollywood Revival fad, but in the end, the one look that makes my heart skip a beat is linen slips with a seagrass rug. This look has appealed to me for so long now, I suspect it always will. In my very first apartment - over 30 years ago - I had a white Haitian cotton sofa (remember those?) with a crisp blue and white cotton print. And for my first house – I used a cream and taupe striped linen with slipcovers on just a few chairs, and a coir rug. As this was almost 19 years ago, I didn’t have the resources for sofa slipcovers or seagrass – that wouldn’t happen for another few years or so until the opening of Renea Abbott’s Shabby Slips, which really helped promote the slipcover craze in Houston.

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White slipcovers and seagrass – a Houston tradition. Design by Lisa Epley.

Some many years ago, my friend hired interior designer Carol Glasser and promptly put down wall to wall seagrass in her older River Oaks house – both upstairs and down. The beauty of all that newly laid seagrass made an lasting impression on me. It smelled so fresh and still today – not much beats the scent of fresh, green seagrass. Houston is a seagrass town and I credit Glasser for first championing the look. Other great Houston designers were also early proponents of the natural textured rug – Pam Pierce, Babs Watkins, and Ginger Barber, among them. These four women, who without a doubt are some of the biggest talents in Houston design, share a certain aesthetic that relies heavily on slipcovers, linen, seagrass and antiques – both English and French. All four eschew anything false – all fabrics are natural, the antiques are not reproductions, and there is a mix of the high and the low. All four will confidently use a cotton check in the living room, along with seagrass, mixed in with priceless antiques from Europe and the finest of silk curtains. Their look is basically casual yet it is still quite elegant, a careful blend of rough textures with fine lined antiques. It’s a look that Gerrie Bremermann in New Orleans spent a career perfecting – in fact Bremermann often seems to be a Houston designer. And though all these designers certainly use other flooring options – plain colorless or muted striped dhurris, priceless Oushaks, or wool patterned carpets, seagrass remains a mainstay in their design. Regardless of the other choices available, Houston is firmly a seagrass town. I have long heard this rumor, which I believe to be true judging by the pictures from the Houston Real Estate web site:

Creative Flooring, a tony rug shop in Houston, sells more seagrass than any store in America!!

True? I have no idea, but certainly believable. Creative Flooring is owned by the gorgeously handsome (!!) Greg Manteris who just happens to be wed to darling Renea Abbott, owner of Shabby Slips – another very influential designer in town - so funnily enough - through their marriage they have cornered the slipcover and seagrass market. They need to have children – I can’t imagine how beautiful they will be!!

image The very talented Carol Glasser in her former house with wall to wall seagrass. Glasser was one of the first in Houston to introduce seagrass.

Why seagrass? I receive many emails with questions about the product, probably as many as I get about slipcovers, if not more. So, why seagrass? To me, seagrass is an exceptional material, far superior to sisal – and yes, there is a world of difference between the two. Seagrass is made from sea grass of course – mostly found in China where the majority of the rugs originate. Since it is grown in water, the product is basically non-absorbent and is a strong, sturdy fiber. The absorbency aspect is very important: seagrass is not easily stained. If something is spilled on it – coffee or coke – it can easily be cleaned with a damp towel - and it will eventually dry without leaving a spot or watermark. Sisal on the other hand is made from the agave plant. Spill something on light colored sisal and you might as well throw it out. If you try to get a coffee or coke spill out with a damp towel, you will get a lasting watermark stain. The only way to prevent the watermark on sisal is to wet the entire rug – not a viable solution. Other favorable seagrass qualities are they are great for a low dust and allergy free environment. Seagrass is static free and does not attract dust or dirt. You can vacuum it like any other rug. They are durable, yet very inexpensive – much less than sisal - another selling point. Seagrass, when fresh will be decidedly green, yet as time goes on, it mellows to a more khaki color. Additionally, this variegated appearance helps to make it appear cleaner, as opposed to sisal’s more even color appearance.

image Seagrass in its different weaves – the middle picture is the ‘plain Jane” of seagrass and the one I like the most!

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Sisal is identified by flat, thin rows tightly woven together. Stains and watermarks are legendary with sisal. Though the maintenance is high with sisal, it does have a place in a dressier room. It is a more elegant looking rug than seagrass and it comes in many colors. The diamond patterned sisal is an extremely popular rug

Seaming: Seagrass only comes in 13’ wide rolls, which means for larger rugs and wall to wall applications, the seagrass will need to be seamed. Many enquiries I get are about this seaming process. A customer not familiar with seagrass will go to a carpet store that is even less familiar with seagrass and the employee will say they can’t guarantee the seaming – that it will be visible – and will try to dissuade the purchase. I can guarantee you that you will not notice the seaming in a seagrass rug. Ever. If the seams do come apart, which is a possibility – the installer can return to glue them back together. Seaming is a non–issue, though many shops try to make it one. If you come across this attitude – find another installer, one who knows about seams.

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Seaming on the job. For the Tanglewood House, all the cutting, binding and seaming was done at the house which slowed down the installation process considerably. But, it was a rush job so I was thankful just to get it completed.

Binding: Another issue is the binding. Personally I like binding to match the seagrass in color. To me – a colored border becomes too much of a contrast and the binding becomes the unintentional focal point. While seagrass stays relatively clean looking throughout its life (can you say the same for carpet?) the bindings can show wear and tear. After a few years, if your binding gets high traffic, the installer can return to your house and rebind it for a small fee, leaving you with a fresh looking rug.

image Pottery Barn likes to sell seagrass with colored bindings. Notice though how the red binding becomes a focal point here. I prefer the binding to match the natural color of the seagrass.

Wall-To-Wall: Besides being used as area rugs, seagrass is wonderful laid wall to wall. Once laid, I recommend a quarter round molding be placed over the rug to keep the edges down. It’s not mandatory though and indeed in some applications, molding is not an option. Again, with wall to wall seagrass, there will be seaming, but the installer should properly place the seams where you will get the most use of the entire roll without much scrap left over. Wall to wall seagrass is much cheaper than many carpets and this is a great selling point.

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Perfectly installed wall to wall seagrass – quarter round molding placed over the seagrass.

The Comfort Factor: Is it comfortable? Seagrass is not the same as plush wall to wall carpet. Nope, it is not. But, taking in account that all natural fiber rugs are scratchy, itchy, and uncomfortable, seagrass is by far the least offensive. It truly is bearable and not really so unappealing that a youngster won’t crawl on it. Laine, my too-adorable great-niece, was over and had a great time crawling around on the seagrass without any complaints at all! Sisal, and especially coir, are far more uncomfortable than seagrass, in most people’s opinions. Coir, made from coconut is such an awful product, I wouldn’t recommend it for anything other than outside areas around pools – it is very water soluble. But, saying all that, recently a new product has come to market – Soft Seagrass - which is touted as being extra comfortable and softer than traditional seagrass. I tried it out recently and it DID seem nicer to touch – so if the comfort factor is a sticking point, look for this product.

image This mother in River Oaks put down several round soft rugs in her baby’s room to soften the horrid seagrass! But, this is a cute idea if you are concerned about your baby’s tender knees.

Custom Cut Seagrass: When buying a seagrass rug, I always stress to get a custom cut rug. That is, have an installer come to your house and make a template of the room where the rug is to be placed. The rug should fit around the perimeter of the room – following all the curves and corners of the room about 3 to 10 inches away from the wall. The amount of wood you want showing is a personal preference. Myself, I prefer the rugs to be just 2 to 5 inches away from the walls. When cutting the seagrass around a fireplace hearth – the rug should fit snug up to the hearth – no more than one inch away from it. Any competent installer will know all this. While custom cut seagrass is a little more expensive than say an 8 x 10 rug from Pottery Barn - the difference in appearance is tremendous and worth every cent. A custom cut rug is just much finer looking and should be the chosen option if at all possible. If a custom cut seagrass is not in your budget, then get the largest sized area rug your room will hold. Good sources for standard rug sizes are Pottery Barn and www.homedecorators.com. In Houston, I order seagrass from two suppliers: Marc Anthony Rugs here. If you do call Marc Anthony, be sure to tell them Joni sent you! And of course, Creative Flooring (713-522-1181) has an extensive supply of all types of natural fiber rugs, including seagrass.

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Perfectly custom cut seagrass – notice the space around the wall – just a few inches of wood showing. And notice the way the rug is cut around the fireplace hearth – it follows the hearth, but it is cut 1/2 to 1 inch from the hearth (be sure to cut the rug closer to the hearth than you did to the walls – a very important detail.) Designer: Janewoodinteriors@yahoo.com.

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A STRONG argument in favor of custom cut seagrass. In this showcase house, a standard seagrass was used instead of a custom cut one. Notice how on the right side the carpet is pulled almost onto the wall in order to fit to fit the left side around the fireplace. Yet, the large space to the left and right of the fireplace is left bare! A properly cut seagrass that actually fits the room would be so much more appealing. Of course, this was done in the show house for budgetary reasons, but if you can avoid this in your own home, do.

I have lived with seagrass for over 15 years now and can’t sing its praises enough. It seems the perfect floor covering, easy to keep clean, and it maintains its appearance with little or no wear or tear. It’s perfect for a casual decor or a fancier room and since it’s flat you can layer a dressier area rug over it. I have had no problems with my rugs. The seams have all held and pet stains are easily removed as opposed to sisal or coir. No one in my family has ever complained about the feel of the rugs, not my crawling daughter, or my husband who likes to lay on the floor with a pillow and watch TV, or my dogs who can usually be found snoring on the seagrass. But mostly, I just love the way it looks, the way it smells, the way its natural texture is the perfect foil for silk or velvet or linen. Wall to wall, it is at is loveliest. Is it a fad? Hardly. Natural fiber rugs have been used since the 17th century and in Europe, England especially, they have been a mainstay in houses for generations, far longer than in America. Seagrass is definitely here to stay. If you want to take the seagrass plunge, but still have reservations, try it out with a small area rug from Pottery Barn and use it in the entry or the laundry room or the bedroom. You won’t be disappointed!

Following are pictures of natural fiber rugs. While seagrass is my favorite of course, the other fibers available can be quite beautiful – sisals – especially the diamond pattern, rush, and jute, which Pottery Barn is heavily pushing. When choosing a natural fiber rug, while seagrass is the most well rounded rug, others may be better suited for a specific interior, just choose wisely. Avoid sisal and jute when water might be an issue, such as the kitchen or bathroom. Avoid rush where there is heavy traffic. Don’t buy coir if comfort is a concern. In the end – go with your heart. All natural fiber rugs are relatively inexpensive unlike precious Oriental rugs, and therefore they are easily replaced!

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Gerrie Bremermann used seagrass in an elegant living room – mixing beautiful French antiques with the casual seagrass rug. Gorgeous!

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In this large living room, one long seagrass was used for the entire room. Notice how the natural color of the seagrass adds another element to the palette.

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Wall to wall seagrass in a Houston bedroom – a typical look for Houston designers: monochromatic, pale colors, a mixture of French antiques and painted pieces, slipcovers, upholstered headboards, and curtains with natural textured shades. I adore the lantern over the wine tasting table – charming!!!!

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Here Jeffrey Bilhuber used two seagrass rugs, one for each side of the sofa I suppose! Linen slipcovers and seagrass seem linked to each.

image Because seagrass is a flat weave, area rugs can be layered on top of them – creating a dressier look if desired.

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Lars Bolander frequently uses seagrass – as he did in his former house.

image In this house, Ginger Barber paired slipcovers and antiques with seagrass – a signature look for this popular Houston designer.

image Exquisite French antiques and wonderful painted bois paneling mixes with the natural fiber seagrass rugs.

imageHere a zebra rug is layered on top of the seagrass in an upstairs family room.

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Seagrass custom cut to fit all the corners of the room – again the Houston look – are you beginning to recognize it?

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Phoebe Howard used seagrass in a dressed up family room.

image Sir Evelyn Rothschild’s townhouse in London is covered in seagrass. Like I recently told a reader whose husband didn’t think seagrass was dressy enough for their house, if it’s good enough for the Rothschilds…

imageSeagrass, calm and cooling in this bedroom. I just love this look! Did you recognize the Houston factor here?

image Sisal is not recommended for stairs because of it being slippery, but so many people I know put seagrass on their stairs with no problems at all. Above – seagrass is held into place with iron rods. Though pretty, the rods really are not necessary when using seagrass on stairs.

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In this charming dining room – I think I would have cut the seagrass around the cabinet – it looks unbalanced this way, I think. Darling room – I love the curtains. Yes, Houston!

image In Peter Dunham’s office, he used seagrass, wall to wall – but it looks like no quarter round molding was added. I love going into a shop where seagrass is laid wall to wall. Whenever I do, I know I am going to love its inventory! I adore this room. This picture came from the new web-magazine – www.balustradeandbitters.com. Be sure to read their interview with Dunham – it was fascinating!!!!!

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Even Miles Redd gets on the seagrass bandwagon. Though this is classic and not the typical Redd look – this is one of my favorite of his projects – I absolutely love this bedroom – the painting, the wallpaper!!!

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In the Octagon House, Tami Owen layered a pale rug over wall to wall seagrass.

image Wall to wall seagrass in a Houston bedroom – the former house of Carol Glasser – stripped of all its beautiful Bennison linen.

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And the same master bedroom when Carol Glasser lived there – wall to wall seagrass, of course. Which do you like better, the pared down room, or the Bennison-to-the-max room?

image Here the traditional seagrass was cut in an octagon to follow the shape of the room and table.

image In this client’s living room, I used seagrass, custom cut. Notice how closely the seagrass was cut around the fireplace hearth.

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Charles Faudree used seagrass in a living room in a beach house – along with trendy suzani and zebra fabrics!

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The antique shop 2620 is one of my favorite haunts in Houston. When seagrass is laid wall to wall in a shop, I’m for sure going to love it’s stock! This area of 2620 is Caroline Ellsworth Antiques here – a fabulous place to look for fine antiques. Hmmm….I am trying to remember if I have ever seen a prettier chandelier. Nope! Lately I am obsessed with chandeliers made of gilt wood mixed with crystals for some odd reason.

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Lars Bolander’s Swedish house, wall to wall seagrass, layered with a cow hide.

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A charming bedroom in a 100 year old Galveston house mixes linen bedding and wall to wall seagrass.

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In this fancy family room, Charles Faudree used seagrass with important French antiques, showing how perfectly the two go together!

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Robert McAlpine used Italian antiques and seagrass, another great pairing. Love this man!

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The master of embellishments, major talent Barry Dixon used seagrass on a contemporary stairway – notice the trim, nail heads! Amazing. He continue the seagrass through the living area – also bound in nail heads.

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At Charles Faudree’s country house, he used seagrass and checks along with French and Swedish antiques.

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At David Easton’s weekend house, he used seagrass in this master bedroom. That mirror is so gorgeous! Easton’s country house was a inspiration for many designers – when he sold the house, he held an auction and everything in the house went under the hammer, everything!

image At a Florida guest house, Suzanne Rheinstein used classic seagrass mixed with beautiful French antiques and her famous racetrack ottoman.

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Windsor Smith uses seagrass in her own living room – along with white slipcovers and exotic furniture.

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Atlanta Interior Designer Dan Carithers used seagrass in this very, very beautiful living room, filled with unique antiques. The fireplace is stunning – and the sconces are wonderful – I LOVE this room! I know I say that a lot, but I LOVE this room!

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Miles Redd does slipcovers and seagrass in a country estate.

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Seagrass sets off a small nook on the stair landing. Notice the gorgeous wood floor boards – hard to cover those up! Designer Matthew Patrick Smyth.

image Ginger Barber, one of the original designers in Houston who used seagrass, in her own home she custom cut the material. Notice around the hearth – how close the rug comes. Perfect!

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In this client’s home I layered a very pale antique rug over a custom cut seagrass. The rug adds a touch of dressiness to the living room.

image In the Bennison House, notice how the custom cut seagrass was handled between the two rooms. The area between the door opening was left bare. Again, perfectly handled. Love the dog’s lovie.

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One of the my favorite rooms in Southern Accents this year – a large seagrass covers most of the living room and is the perfect backdrop for all the white slipcovers and zebra rug!

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This room was shown with slipcovers that had shrunk in Design Elements #2. Here is the gorgeous linen fabric that was hiding under the shrunk slipcovers. Wall to wall seagrass goes extremely well with tortoise shell blinds. Design by Carol Glasser.

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Seagrass on stairs – again custom cut, just a few inches from the wall and the binding is done in a neutral color.

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Trend laden apartment by Alex Papachristidis. Fortuny and ikat and suzani – love it!!!

image Houston interior designer Lisa Epley’s own bedroom – white slipped chairs and seagrass – that winning combination. Seagrass surprisingly looks really good in a dark gray room.

image This bedroom made the cover of The World of Interiors: a wonderful old country home in England, with of course, seagrass!

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A look to love – French settee, blue and white checks, seagrass and high heels! Suzanne Rheinstein.

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The Queen of white linen slipcovers and seagrass, Lauren Ross, in her Austin house (any excuse to show this picture again!)

The following pictures show natural fiber rugs other than seagrass. Each different natural fiber rug has a certain appeal. To me, of course, I prefer seagrass for all the reasons stated in the first paragraphs, but that said, I do love all the natural rugs in general. The apple matting type is especially appealing to me aesthetically. Sisal is wonderful in a dressy living room. And the diamond patterned sisal popularized by Stark is made for someone who wants something more interesting than just plain sisal or seagrass:

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This rug is apple matting – a thick natural fiber rug made out of rush – with lots of beefy texture. Apple matting is more popular in England where it has been used for centuries, but it is slowly becoming more popular in the states. Love the lanterns and slips too!

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And the living room next to the above dining room, both rooms by Peter Dunham.

image Years ago Suzanne Rheinstein used apple matting in this living room.

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The other side of Rheinstein’s apple matting living room. Notice the exquisite antiques and fabrics – all dressy, yet paired with the simplest of floor material. Just gorgeous!

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More rush or apple matting. Again, dressy antiques, highly textured rug. This thickness of this textured rug makes a huge statement.

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In this elegant bedroom with Robert Kime linen on the French chairs and hand painted silk wallpaper, a natural fiber rug was used – not sure if this is apple matting or jute, but whatever it is, it is a beautiful choice.

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Sisal is a good choice in sleeker, more contemporary interiors. Here, a room by Matthew Patrick Smyth shows sisal mixed with velvets and linens.

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Here in a dressy setting, this light sisal rug seems to be the correct application.

imageIn Florida, Tom Scheerer used two Stark rugs in an eclectic living room. I love his choice of yellows and pale blues. Such a pretty “beach” house!

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Dressy sisal used in the dining room with hand painted wallpaper and slipped chairs mixed with leather chairs in an interesting combination.

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In this beach house, Charles Faudree used a thickly woven rug placed atop black hardwoods for a high contrast effect. Isn’t this beautiful?

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Gerrie Bremermann uses the Stark diamond sisal rug in this living room. Though sisal and not seagrass, this look is just as effective and slightly dressier. Glorious painting by Amanda Talley – also currently blogging here. I think Amanda’s painting makes the room, don’t you?

image In this apartment that I designed, I used the diamond patterned Stark carpet in the library.

imageAnother diamond pattern sisal in an elegant dining room with hand painted silk wallpaper – divine!

image Another sisal diamond patterned rug used in this library. This rug has black thread running through it which ties in with the decor nicely.

image Sisal comes in different colors which is a selling point over seagrass. Here John Stefinidis used the diamond pattern in creams and red.

imageEven in a gray room, this natural fiber diamond patterned rug looks wonderful.

imageGerrie Bremermann combined the Stark diamond sisal rug in this family room – with a flat oushak is in the living room.

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Alex Papachristidis uses creamy sisal in this NY apartment. I love the zebra layered over the rug but the gold framed prints and the sconces are the true focal points. The sofa and chairs aren’t too shabby either!

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Jeffrey Bilhuber used this natural fiber rug – this one looks like it might be a natural fiber/wool blend. I love this room of his – one of my favorites in his portfolio.

imageA stunning beach house with sisal carpet. The color of the sisal blends into the headboard’s caning and the wall color.

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Another sisal rug – which matches the color of the chair – Barclay Butera.

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Hard to imagine any other floor covering except sisal in this room! I love the orange pops of color in the pillows.

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Rush matting – used in extreme juxtaposition to such finery!

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The same type of matting used by Bunny Williams at her weekend house.

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The living room at Grey Gardens, remodeled by Sally Quinn. Original to the house, the rush matting was found in the attic, sent out for repair and reused by Quinn.

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And finally, my own family room, with its seagrass. Each room in my house has seagrass rugs. It’s hard to imagine I will ever change and use something else, but who knows? Anything’s possible. As for my pillows, the decision on what to do about them is on hold until September. You all gave me wonderful ideas and I am going to use one of them! Just not sure which yet. Be sure to watch here for the fourth installment of Top Ten Design Elements, coming soon! Does anyone have a clue what it might be?

And – the new Skirted Roundtable with the absolutely adorable Anna Spiro from Absolutely Beautiful Things is up and ready to listen to here. Enjoy it – I know you will – she is sooo cute!!!

148 comments:

  1. What issue of Southern Accents is that picture from?

    And, I know you said that your seagrass has held up well to your dogs- but what about big dogs? Is it like berber and you need to watch for nails and heels?

    I think this might have converted me! I had heard the problems with sisal and lumped seagrass in there. I can definitely see an advantage to carpeting in our allergy prone house and love the look of it. But to convince the husband ;)

    Thank you so much for this list. Your reasons for your favorites and all the examples makes it so easy to visualize them in my "normal" home and see the benefits to them all.

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    1. Not to sure I like the lighting in some of those pictures, I think I would be more inclined to go with a ceiling fan such as the ones here http://www.electricalcounter.co.uk/products/Ceiling+Fans/Fantasia+Ceiling+Fans

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  2. Teri = which Southern Accents picture?

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  3. GASP...I made it to the bottom of the post...and you made your point, the images are absolutely beautiful and the explanation so convincing. I always loved and used sisal (timeless, elegant, versatile) and I agree, stains are tough or impossible to eliminate. Never tried seagrass but I certainly will. My mind is numb now but I will try to guess tomorrow about the next Design elements.

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  4. Holy Mackerel! What a post, Joni! Such detail and so many pretty pictures! You have convinced me! I love seagrass, too!

    And David Easton's home has always been like Eden to me! Perfection!

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  5. ok - Teri - it was two months ago - I don't know the exact one because I'm at the beach. but it was just about two issues ago. Sorry I can't be of more help.

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  6. Fabulous post and of course we all knew "seagrass" would be in the top three. Not sure if it will be #4 but I'm guessing chandeliers will be on the list? I mean it was that or ceiling fans LOL

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  7. As always, a beautiful and well-detailed post. I LOVE the Alex Papachristidis photo.

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  8. Holy cow lady!

    What a post. I feel like I now know more about seagrass than any normal person should! What gorgeous pictures. All I have to say is that you really do your homework. The point I take away from this is that every room had seagrass and I loved every one of them, no matter the color scheme or style. Thanks for your exhaustive work.

    Janet

    p.s. Dan Carithers and Suzanne Rheinstein rock.

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  9. Wow, Joni! That was like the epic novel of blog posts AND a textbook-worthy lesson on natural fiber rugs. (aren't you supposed to be on vacation? or is that how you found the time to do all this?!) Too much to choose a favorite from... but I love that you threw in a little Barclay!

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  10. This is a great post. I love seagrass too and really appreciated you going into detail on why, how, where, etc.

    Many thanks!

    xo,
    cristin

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  11. Mercy. I thought Blogger had limits on how many photos per post. So many great examples, I might even try it with my large dogs. Thanks for the heads up about sisal and staining.

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  12. Beautiful images and loved hearing your reasoning for custom cuts- It makes such a difference!

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  13. Gorgeous post - loved every bit of it. I think you outdid yourself on this one!

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  14. talk about eye candy...I love your family room & the Alex Papachristidis room.

    i am truly glad you posted on the subject,,,I have wanted to specifically email you asking about sea grass rugs. Thank you!

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  15. So interesting learning about the differences between all these rugs. I have a good sized sisal that had something spilled on it. It doesn't come out. I will definitely check out seagrass. Once again amazing photos. There are so many. Couldn't even begin to to pick a favorite, but tend to the more neutral palette. Enjoy your vacation.
    marcie

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  16. Loved the post Joni, Thank you!

    Could you give me an idea of the price of seagrass in USA. It is not available here in Indonesia (only marble or tiles used on the equator) and I did a quick google search in Australia and it seems to be hard to find and very expensive.

    I would love to use sea grass in my home, you have hooked me on it!

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  17. That staircase is to die for beautiful, though sea grass is a favorite of mine only for appearance and not for walking barefoot...

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  18. This top ten design elements article is now one of my top ten blogs of all time, anywhere. I am in heaven. In fact, I may never leave this page again. Your design pointers are invaluable. I learn so much from you. Thank you so much.

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  19. Great post - the design elements top 10 is a fantastic reference! Someone just emailed me a few days ago for sources on sisal and seagrass, and I mentioned that you prefer seagrass - now I will send her the link to this post!

    I do like the look of sisal over seagrass. We have had two spills on the sisal, and used a fan immediately to dry the carpet out (I think they were just water spills), with no lasting stains. I guess we were lucky!

    I wonder whether some of the seagrass pictures might actually be sisal? It seems like I see sisal much more in Atlanta than seagrass, but this is just based on my limited experience.

    I adore that chandelier from Caroline Ellsworth Antiques - I have had a fixation with Italian giltwood and crystal chandeliers for a while(there is a term...I can't remember it - maybe Genovese chandeliers). Was that picture taken recently?

    Finally, the Dan Carithers room you have in this post - I walk or drive by that house at least once a week. It is not far from my house - on the Brookhaven side of Atlanta (as opposed to Buckhead). I will snap a picture and send it to you, the house is French in style and very beautiful.

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  20. What a great post! You always do such an amazingly detailed job. I am curious to know if you have any thoughts on Abaca rugs. I have seen them pop up in a few magazines lately but don't know much about them.

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  21. Oh - one more question. Do you need to stick to one look - i.e. if you have sisal, would it look bad to use seagrass under the kitchen table? I have sisal in my family room, and need something for under my kitchen table. I think seagrass would be great, with its green tone, but the two types of rugs would be very close to one another and I am wondering if this would look weird.

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  22. Beautiful as always! What a dream staircase! I think #4 will be lanterns?

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  23. Beautiful post as always! That staircase was amazing! I think #4 will be lanterns?
    Tina

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  24. I love your seagrass post. We have it wall to wall in our upstairs and on our staircase. As I was falling down the stairs this morning and our fabulous seagrass was scratching up my legs and hands, I wasn't as big of a fan!

    All in all, it's so easy to design around and maintain.

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  25. I could not believe it when I logged onto your post this morning. I want to change the rug in my living room and update it with the seagrass/ sisal look. Your information on how to have them cut and laid helped me enormously. Are there any particular brands of seagrass that you recommend?

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  26. That is some kind of post! My Mother is not internet-ready and I am going to print out your entire article for her. She's redecorating our house in Baton Rouge and ordered a custom seagrass for the living room. This will totally confirm her decision! You really covered all of the bases with that--thank you! And thank you for including my painting in the post too! When I worked for Gerrie Bremermann, the seagrass she used the most was the Diamond Pattern Stark that you featured. That one is a budget breaker though!! Again, you got it all!

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  27. Loving your Top 10 posts! Thank you. Maybe animal prints as #4? Chandeliers or lighting in general? I look forward to checking back to see!

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  28. okay, my sisal rug is ready to go anyway - so seagrass it is! The first of the two posts of rooms by Miles Redd absolutely knocks my socks off! The one with the dramatic wallpaper - talk about wow factor! Wonderful article.
    Suzanne from St. Simons

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  29. Thank you for a fantastic post!!!--as always!
    Would you address one concern I have--seagrass odor. I bought a seagrass rug from Pottery Barn a couple of years ago for my teenagers' lounge and it had a strong odor as soon as we unrolled it and put it down. It wasn't a bad odor but it was very strong. We tried everything because I loved the look and the price. I put down fans, I lifted up the rug to air it out, I gave it about a month to release its scent--nothing worked and Pottery Barn was not very helpful with suggestions. I was, of course, allowed to return the rug for a full refund but they did not suggest just returning that rug and getting a new one delivered. Instead they talked me into buying a more expensive wool sisal. What do you think? Have you ever heard of that problem before? Thanks for addressing this concern!

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  30. Great post Joni...such an education on seagrass...I feel that I now know it all.
    Could your next design favorite be blue and white Chinese porcelain? It has to be that or lighting ( lanterns and a great chandy). Can't wait to see!

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  31. WOW, what a dense post! My scroll finger cramped up.
    The dining room with the gray papered walls, the black table and searing blue accents is one of the most striking rooms I think I've ever seen. Details please and thank you, Joni.

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  32. this is def what I will be putting under my dining table, thanks for all the great pics!

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  33. I have 7 dogs and the occasional accident on the seagrass rugs...have on hand Nature's Miracle (I buy at Petco)...it IS a miracle! Michael Smith suggests Pottery Barn's Coir rug as a substitute for apple matting. And,I agree, slipcovers and seagrass-nothing better!

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  34. Joni, so many great examples of sea grass and how designers use it! Your top ten post are genius!

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  35. Joni, what an educational post. Thank you!!! I love the look of seagrass. I can't wait to see what your 2nd Design Element will be!!!
    Hugs~

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  36. I'm guessing lighting as your next design element post. You've shown great sconces in past rooms.

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  37. Joni, two questions:
    1) Do you vacuum the seasgrass as you would standard plush carpeting???

    2) You mentioned dogs and children. If a liquid spills or the dogs have an accident is it easy to get the liquid up from the woven seagrass? Just curious how it cleans up from something like that. {That's one of my concerns .... the second concern was the comfort of lying on it. But, you've got me convinced that that would be A-Okay for my crew!) :)

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  38. Also, www.naturalarearugs.com is an easy way to order seagrass rugs in basic sizes...they have frequent sales!

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  39. Again, time to write that book! Professor Webb you did your subject and your subjects proud. Love the texture and the wonderful contrasts. How does coffee and red wine wear on seagrass?

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  40. Ah, I think I need some Houston style in my new Virginia home. I am in love with the look. I've always been worried about splinters from the roughness of the seagrass, but I think I'm going to bite the bullet.

    Thank you, by the way, for visiting my blog. That was very sweet of you.

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  41. Yum! That post was so good I could eat it! I, too, have seagrass in my galley kitchen and my family room. I absolutely love it and wouldn't have anything else. My husband just this morning was saying the same thing! Would you believe that? He had a late night craving for pancakes last night and spilled some mix on the carpet. I woke up and saw it and said, "UH! Somebody spilled pancakes on my seagrass rug!" To which he replied, "It's fine. I'll just take it outside and hose it off. I love these rugs!"
    My ? to you is this: can you just hose them down and let them air dry? That is what we do and it seems to work fine.
    My dog loves the rug so much he chewed a ginormous hole in it, but no worries, we just covered it with the sofa. :)
    Awesome post! I loved every bit of it!
    xx

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  42. This was a brilliantly, breathtakingly done piece. What can you tell us about the latex backing I see on many of the ready made grass rugs? Should the Sea Grass rug have a latex backing? And speaking of backings, should the Sea Grass rug use a rug pad underneath, and if so, what kind is recommended? I soooo want to give Sea Grass a try, especially now hearing it will clean up after the dog fairly well.

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  43. Let's see... Element #4???? I'm not sure where these things will fall in the line-up, but I am 100% certain that your top ten will include...

    MIRRORS & CHANDELIERS

    And I/m fairly certain the top ten will include...

    BLUE AND WHITE CHINA/TRANSFERWARE

    THE COLOR WHITE (in slips and ironstone)

    LANTERNS

    And would you list ANTIQUES as an element, in a broad sense? I think, probably, yes :)

    And it seems to me that Houston design often incorporates a few black accents to pop in a room - often in lampshades.

    How did I do after reading faithfully for 4 short months? :)

    XO,
    Jacci

    P.S. Thanks for the seagrass post! As always, I feel like you're teaching us some very valuable stuff!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  44. so much info!!!! Yes, we're loving our wall-to-wall seagrass (Definitely owing to you & Brooke frmo velvet & Linen haha) ... loving ths look & feel & Christian can even ride his little sccooter around on it!!! We've already had our share of spills & no issues!!!

    will bookmark this post because I'm loving every image & need to spend more time on it. you're the best,
    xoxo,
    lauren

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  45. Thanks Joni !! Your website is the only one which "teaches" us designer info. we can use in our own homes. Thanks for taking your time out to show us photos and give us your written expertise on fabulous decorating! I appreciate all of the "time" you spend on creating this website. Love the "sisal" !!

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  46. Error....I meant to say love the "SEAGRASS" !!!!

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  47. Joni,
    I just finished a post about daybeds (I borrowed one of your photos and linked to your blog - and was coming by to tell you!) in which I was pondering a sisal rug to go below my newly upholstered daybed. I am now thinking seagrass would be a better choice for me!

    I absolutely adore your blog. I started following you from your comments on Decorno. Your style reminds me of my Dallas, Texas Interior Designer Mother in Law - who I miss dearly (she passed away 8 years ago.) I ended my daybed post with a little design dilemma, I would be honored if you had the time to take a look and give me your opinion! http://www.dreamsintertedwined.blogspot.com

    Fondly :)
    Heidi

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  48. Wow! Lots of eye candy here! Thank you so much for introducing me to seagrass..I dont think I have ever seen it in person...what does it feel like on bare feet? Love the "Houston" look...I am now on the hunt for chairs/slipcovers and a zebra rug! (Love the library with the diamond patterned Stark rug.)

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  49. Gorgeous photos, as usual. I can personally vouch for the durability of sea grass and pets. My two long haired cats treat it as their horizontal scratching post, shed, and cough up the occassional hairball and it still looks great. I just spot clean with water, vacuum and it's fine. Of course, no one who read this will want to come to my house after that description! Oh, well! Deborah

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  50. Thank you Joni! I need to see if I have that issue of Southern Accents of it the library does.

    I think the next design element will be Sharper Image fans! ;)

    Thank you again

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  51. Thank you for the amazing post. You answered all the questions I had! Merci

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  52. Ok, I'm sold! That was an amazing post and I need no further convincing. Seagrass, it is! Thanks for the many, many pictures. Always inspiring to see how an element is used in different rooms.

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  53. We have a 9x 11 seagrass in our family room with leather furniture (hubbie's desire) and I love how it looks, wears, smells! and cleans up. We live in NY and I don't think our friends "get it". They think it is an indoor/outdoor patio rug. We don't care...after your post-I'm eaven happier! Now I want wall to wall!
    ~Nancy

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  54. Gorgeous as usual.

    Oh, I love the porch picture you credited to Bunny Williams. I just did a post on "haint blue" and its history, as I recently did the front porch ceiling of my stone cottage in my version of haint blue.

    Do you see haint blue porches in your area? Maybe you are far enough west to not have gotten the Carolina low country influence. :)

    Here is a link in case you are interested:
    http://cottageofstone.blogspot.com/2009/07/blue-porch-ceilings-for-good-luck-its.html

    -- Sarah Beth

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  55. love all of this! I bought a seagrass rug when we moved into our house and I absolutely love it. if it can survive potty-training a puppy, I suppose it can survive most anything!

    my binding is neutral and is really showing some wear. I might look into having it replaced soon -- good idea. and then maybe having it Scotch Guarded or something.

    one day maybe I'll have custom-cut rugs ... sigh ...

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  56. I've always loved the look of seagrass, but hesitated to use it because of it's roughness (small children, picky husband). But, after following your blog for many months, I insisted on seagrass when we started decorating our bedroom and am thrilled with the results. Surprisingly, the price of our custom cut and bound rug seemed quite affordable for its size (13x19) and what a difference it makes in the look of the room.

    I've just ordered a lantern for my breakfast nook and expect that will be your next Top 10.

    Thanks for all that you do!

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  57. This makes me want more seagrass in my house. Love all these examples! I would love to do my whole downstairs either in wall to wall seagrass or stain the concrete. I hate my carpet. Now you've got me thinking about putting on my stairs eventually. one set of them anyway. Love it!

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  58. Love this post. I'm in love with seagrass rugs. The runner on the stairs is my favorite. I hope you are enjoying yourself.

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  59. Joni,

    I've followed your blog for quite a while now...and all I can say is...thank you! I feel like I have learned so much from your detailed posts. We are in the middle of a major remodel on our "new" house, and these top ten posts couldn't have come at a better time. I had planned on doing a custom cut seagrass rug in our formal living and dining areas, but still had some unanswered questions. Not now! Now...the big decision is an antique Italian chandy or a lantern in the formal? Maybe your next post will help with that!

    Blessings from Oklahoma!
    Sara

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  60. Hi Joni,

    it's really wonderful to follow interior design on your side of the ocean.
    I enjoy reading your posts...and I have to admire all the great work you put down, we all know it takes a lot of time as well. My hat is off for you, Joni!

    This time I was especially glad as I found the Swedish top designer Lars Bolander mentioned, he if anyone knows how to mix Gustavian antiques with modern living and it looks all very traditional. I think your photo is from his summer cottage in southern Sweden. Correct if I'm wrong, please!
    His stock of partly Swedish old furniture in the N.Y store is top class.

    I love to use sisal as well, it's a piece of cake to mix with almost any style....but I have one small problem my self, sometimes I get a slight allergy when it's brand new. Depends on the type of rug. Anyone else noticed this problem? I'd like to know if there is any trick for it...

    For you subject of design elements, my card is either antiques or perhaps drapes!

    Thanks a lot!

    Ingela

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  61. Hi, Joni. Love yor blog. It's been my BFF since my hubby left to work out of state. Anyhow, this is in part to justify the purchase of a coffee table i arguably didn't need - but why would you have NOT used a glass coffee table for your beautiful family room. I replaced my glass one for a beautiful wood and need some reasons for hubby!! I can't hide this purchase or convince him that he was with me when i saw it and okayed me buying it (i find that works some times!) :-)

    --Cindy

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  62. Joni...I love seagrass too...love contrasting it against dressier fabrics...so warm and cozy. I used it in my bedroom 5-6 years ago when I redid that room. You've got me thinking about it now for my main stairway. :-) So many beautiful rooms in this post...thanks for sharing them all...I could drool allllll day!
    Susan

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  63. Joni, you have thoroughly converted me into a full-fledged seagrass fan. Love the stuff! Also, I need to listen to Anna on the SRT....love her!

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  64. Hi Joni,
    I am totally digging your Top Ten list!!! You have answered all of the questions I've had bouncing around in my head about seagrass....I am sold!!!

    Thanks so much for your compliment on my fireplace redo. For a trip home to Houston, I would gladly hire out for tile work!

    Have a fabulous time at the beach!
    Nola
    The Bloom Girls
    Nashville, TN

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  65. I've been trying to get my parents to do seagrass but mom wonders how well it would be in the dry dry AZ desert??? Perhaps you can drop me aa answer to help me finally convince her??? I'd apprecaite it a great deal.
    I love the diamond pattern & the first image with the zebra rug...the one with all the black accents.
    Just a fabulous collection of images & a true encylopedia of seagrass info, Joni. Thank you so much. If this can't convince them nothing will.

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  66. Ah! I am now enlightened. Never knew all the technical aspects of seagrass vs sisal. Knew I disliked sisal but never 'got' seagrass to be honest. I currently have a wonderful area rug in our living room out of jute and I must stay I adore it. However, seagrass now definitely intrigues me!

    Thank you!!!

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  67. Another fantastically-illuminating post!

    I hope I'm not the first to thank you for your candid perspective on design elements. Your straightforward and thorough approach to beautiful interiors is so delightful, downright generous. I know I'm not alone in thinking you just might be the design world's Mother Theresa!

    Best,
    alison g.
    My Little Happy Place

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  68. Thanks for all of the wonderful information!

    Where would you recommend looking for a larger than normal size seagrass rug (12x14)? Is custom most likely our only option?

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  69. Alright Joni,

    You talked me into it. I am going to order a 8x10 rug and see how I like it before going full bore.

    I too love the look.

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  70. Joni--
    I've been reading your blog for quite a long while and must say I look forward to each and every post...you're so informative!!! I had gotten a seagrass rug I intended to cut down and use in our morning room, but before I could get to that project, our lovely Golden chewed a hole in our relatively-new wool oriental in the family room (he did it, but there were "extenuating circumstances" HA!). As much as I loved that new rug, it was dark wine and black and was always covered with blonde Golden hairs and took forever to vaccum. I had been thinking of trying the new seagrass in its place and after reading your post, I did it last night and am thoroughly pleased!!! (I have always wanted to add a cowhide rug in this room and now this will be the perfect opportunity to do that, too.) The seagrass will certainly be easier to keep clean. Thank you for the extra push I needed!!! (Now, I'll have to buy ANOTHER seagrass rug for the morning room!!!) Cheryl in Birmingham, AL

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  71. Seagrass looks great but I love the way jute feels under the feet.

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  72. It is amazing how versatile seagrass is. Your incredible post certainly proves that! I love the wall to wall sea grass we installed when we first purchased our weekend home. It's so durable and neutral. I know that even if I decide to change the furniture my seagrass will still look great. Instead of using a quarter round we used matching rope around the room. I stole that idea from Dan Marty. It looks fantastic.

    xo
    Brooke

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  73. Hi Joni! Loved this post; so many great inspiration photos- not just for the rugs, but for the goregous decorating! I've had boucle sisal rugs for years in a family room and diining and never had any problem with spills, but I do get to them quickly (and no kids!) We just put wall to wall boucle sisal in our master closet... I love the way it feels underfoot, like a massage!
    And while I love the close to the wall cuts, after spending way-too-many-thousands to sand and stain my antique wide planks, I want to 'see' my wood floors!
    I really, really enjoyed this one! Thank you for all the hard work!
    joan

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  74. Wow!! What a fabulous line up of photos. Some of my very favorite rooms too, like Butera and Bilhuber's. I totally agree with you. As your photos show, a seagrass rug will anchor any room and provide a timeless sophistication. How fun too to see your family room. I can't wait to see your next post. Have a great weekend! Lisa

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  75. love, love, love this post. I'm so in love with seagrass now, and my new home will have it everywhere!

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  76. You are amazing. Incredible post with gorgeous photos. I always learn so much from you!

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  77. Definitely a great education!

    But since I sell the stuff, I have to give you a little warning. I actually let out a little gasp and then shook my head at all those stupid apple rush matting pics!!! Joni!!! I don't know about Houston, but in Dallas, it is too dry a climate for it. It literally dries out and starts to disentergrate (as in big holes where the client would stand up to get out of bed!!!). Within a period of 6 months!! You would have to mist it down at least once every week or two just to keep it up here. We won't sell it, and if a client insists, we have a disclaimer for them to sign (and that's a nation-wide disclaimer). To me, it's just not worth it. Especially when you can get that same weave in an Abaca (similar to a sisal) or get a chunky look from a jute.

    But seagrass is wonderful. I do love sisal too, though.

    Thanks for all the beautiful pictures and the shout-outs (I love seeing the "Natura" diamond pattern down - it's so pretty).

    Have a great time at the beach!

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  78. * OK, Joni... SO, I STARTED to read this the "FIRST TIME"~~~ was LOVING every single charming pic & informative sentence & THEN got interrupted by the phone!!! SOOOO, I started ALLL OVER again(just to get the "full effect", you know!) and voila... MORE interruptions!!! SO THENNNN I said "@*^#$&%^#!" the phones & I FINISHED... Whew! What a FANTABULOUS read~~~ even MOOOORE FANTABULOUS PICS too, Joni!!!

    You NEVER FAIL TO EXCITE with your detailed info & wunnnnnaful pics~~~~ WOW!

    Thank you, ten times over!!! SOOOOO VERRRRY DELICIOUS!!!!!!!!

    Hugs,
    Linda *

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  79. Awesome pictures. Seagreass is not something I had evr considered, but I am blown away!

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  80. Joni- remember to enter my giveaway. It started today and it will go on until Monday. Have a wonderful weekend!

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  81. Excellent information - thank you. I will definitely recommend your site to my clients. Most people don't know how important the things that you highlighted are.

    Thanks for helping spread the good word!

    http://Candelabra.org

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  82. . Never evern again will I have sisal in my house. As you mentioned it is notorious for showing stains and watermarks. Fortunately I only have a large rug and not carpeting in sisal. I have had the rug in a low traffic area and despite this I will have to throw it out. It looks so grotty. Sure I have three boys and a large dog, but the fact that it is a low traffic area and the rest of the carpeting is fine leads me to my decision to turf the rug never to be "bought" again. I love the Seagrass though. Great post. Thanks Joni.

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  83. I love to try the Sonoma Lavender hanger covers.

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  84. As always, I am inspired when I visit your blog. Although seagrass was the subject of the blog, there were so many things in addition to the sea grass to inspire me. But when I came to the pic of that chandelier at the antique store, my browser clicking finger stopped in mid air; my mouth flew open; and I had to tear myself away to see the rest of the pictures. I know I've never seen a more beautiful chandelier. I am stunned by the beauty, but I bet the price would stun me even more! I can never get enough of yours and Charles F's decor. Different styles, but both something I would love to be able to pull off. laurie

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  85. I love the rush matting. Jeffrey Bilhuber uses it a lot too.

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  86. I would love to try the Texas Lavender Hills Culinary Lavender Buds. My daughter got married in June and at the bridesmaid's luncheon we served Lavender champagne as the guests arrived. Not only did it taste wonderful but we used a beautiful lavender plant on the table and gave each of the guests a hand made lavender sachet as a favor. I just received
    "The Lavender Cookbook" available on the site for my birthday and would love to have the lavender buds to try some of the amazing sounding recipes!

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  87. The sachets by the yard definitely!! I adore lavender, My linen closet is scented with it and I love putting sachets in such places as end table and night stand drawers, suitcases, and I've even had one in my purse!!
    Christy

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  88. The seagrass rugs are amazing and that zebra rug is great! made me smile.

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  89. I'm waaaay late commenting on this post (waaaay behind on blog reading)... but just a note to say BRAVO (as usual) on such an awesome compilation of images... I will reference this post often! Thank you!!!

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  90. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!!! This post, along with your e-mail, made my day. I'm so sorry I didn't get to comment until today. I am searching high and low for a retailer, other than Pottery Barn, to contact regarding a seagrass rug for my living room. Do you know of anyone in the Hill Country? Thank you again. Now my husband is excited about seagrass, too :)
    Ariel

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  91. I absolutely love your blog! This post (and every other one) is so informative and helpful....especially for young, aspiring young decorators like myself.

    Thank you for all of the beautiful images and leaving us with all of this fabulous knowledge!

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  92. Wow! You didn't write a blog on seagrass; you wrote the bible!

    I ordered a rug from Marc Anthony as you suggested and am very,very happy with it. I plan to order more wall to wall for upstairs. I told him you had referred me!! Thanks!

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  93. I absolutely love the look of seagrass. I think for my family room I would prefer to have something a bit softer. Is there a wool carpet that can really pull off the look of seagrass? If so, PLEASE tell me!!!

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  94. I ADORE your blog. Thank you, thank you for all of your creative inspiration!
    I do have one question...can you tell me what the difference is between Jute and Seagrass? I am going to purchase one soon for my little cottage!

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  95. My husband has an obsession with ceiling fans as well, and me with chandeliers. Both of us want one (respectively) in most rooms. Mars and Venus I guess, right?

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  96. What I love about you and what you do here is the 50 gazillion pictures you show us to make a point....i LOVE it. I'd never heard of sea grass until your post and we're needing to replace a berber that is damaged due to a water leak...and up until reading this, I had in mind to stain the concrete - but think this could be wonderful.

    what i'm understanding though (need to go back through beginning paragraphs) is that it's not something laid down like traditional carpets - not tack stripped around the edges....

    thanks joni..you're awesome...
    lylah

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  97. You have a really informative website. pls continue sharing. ;)
    Web business model

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  99. Joni, just found your blog! AMAZING!! I'm looking for a home in Houston. I love anything Ginger Barber touches! I found a home on Mid Lane that has sold on HAR, you have 3 pics of it on this blog. Bedroom has lantern above table (all neutrals). I wonder if Ginger was the designer?

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  100. regina -
    not sure who did that apartment. could be ginger. but i just don't know. sorry!!!
    JOni

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  101. I own Hemphill's Rugs & Carpets in Costa Mesa, CA. We use seagrass with an attached urethane cushion when installed wall to wall. In fact, seagrass is our number one selling wall to wall product. We typically install at least one whole house a week with this great material.

    A few summers ago, we installed seagrass in the Pi Phi Sorority house at the University of Southern California.

    We have a loyal following of designers that love the seagrass products as well.

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  102. Wow... your site is so interesting. I just wanted to know how do you monetize it? Can you give me a few advices? For example, I use http://www.bigextracash.com/aft/2e7bfeb6.html

    I'm earning about $1500 per month at he moment. What will you recommend?

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  103. I think, seagrass is one of the best carpets I've known. I like the simplicity of this carpet. We also have carpets in our home, but they're not seagrass. In order to maintain the durability and beauty, we clean them with our vacuum. But there are times that our cleaning materials are not enough to clean our carpets. That's why we LA carpet cleaning services.

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  104. I share the same opinion as you, I adore seagrass! We are in process of cutting up a seagrass area rug to use as wall-to-wall carpeting in our small entryway, I just love how it's turning out! Anyway, I was wondering if you were aware that many of the photos in this post are not showing up or maybe it's just on my end??? Thanks!
    Jen @Liberty Cottage

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  105. I really like the look of the seagrass carpet. I am going to put it in my kids bathroom.

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  106. recently put seagrass in all my bedrooms in a house built in 1972.

    looks great!

    used mike at south texas carpets, on richmond in houston.....they did a great job!

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  107. I had googled "apple matting" because I'm writing about a living room that has a beautiful apple matting rug and I wanted to find out more about it. This is the most informative post/article I have ever come across and I am bookmarking it for future and frequent reference. Thanks so much!

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  108. I had googled "apple matting" because I'm writing about a living room that has a beautiful apple matting rug and I wanted to find out more about it. This is the most informative post/article I have ever come across and I am bookmarking it for future and frequent reference. Thanks so much!

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  109. I was truly reluctant to check out your article the first time I saw the page layout of your blog. But I was greatly amazed on the post you have written.

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  110. I am really amazed by the pictures you placed in your blog...no words.

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  111. This is a great blog and very informative! I love the seagrass rugs now that I've taken time to look through your site. We like the look of bamboo and I'm on a mission to find a variety of bamboo rugs for my store. http://bestbamboomats.com

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  112. Joni,
    Do you recommend a certain brand or manufacturer for wall to wall seagrass?

    thank you,
    Jan

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  113. Joni,

    I just came across your blog through Pinterest while I was looking for inspiration for wall-to-wall carpeting. I had heard of sisal and jute before, but never seagrass. After reading your post, I really, truly believe I have found a flooring solution for the house my husband and I just put an offer on. If all goes well and we get the house, I may just be using seagrass. Do you have any recommendations for places from where to purchase it and have it installed? I live around the DC area. And, I second Like the Bereans' question, too!

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  114. Joni, thanks as always for your amazing post. I'm sending a link to my husband to try to convince him. Still a little concerned about big dog's nails snagging it and teenagers complaining about the softness (or lack). But hey, the teenagers will be gone in three years!!

    You are amazing!!

    Libby

    ReplyDelete
  115. Hello Joni,

    I am a new reader to your blog (came through "For the Love of a House"), I enjoyed this post quite a bit. Answered a lot of questions. You say you should bring the rug to within an inch of the hearth, is this the same for a raised hearth?

    Thanks, Zachary Baker (nvstyg@yahoo.com)

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  118. Hello Joni,
    I love your blog! I too would like some more info on seagrass. I am interested in installing it in 3 bedrooms. There is only one flooring contractor here in Laredo, TX that has installed it before. He has only one line that he shows. Is there one particular brand/line and style that I should look for? Also should I go with the latex backed seagrass or not? He told me it should be glued down to the foundation for wall to wall installation, is that correct? Please send reply to pcbruni@hotmail.com
    Fondly,
    Patty

    ReplyDelete
  119. I have wall to wall seagrass in my bedroom and while it's attractive and durable, it's not even remotely comfortable. Kneeling or sitting on it is just not done. I think your comments about your husband and children lying on it are probably greatly exaggerated.

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  121. I realize that you wrote this post years ago, but it was exactly what I needed to read today. Thank you for all the photos and information. I can't wait to use a seagrass rug in my living room.

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